Posts tagged “Marvel”

Tuesday, 19 February 2019

Captain Marvel’s Marvelous Website

Captain Marvel's Marvelous Website

Marvelous… simply marvelous…

So the next big Marvel Movie will be Captain Marvel, coming out sometime next month (I can’t be bothered to look up the exact release date right now). I’m very excited for this movie! And it’s always great when a movie has a fantastic website to help get you hype.

One thing about Captain Marvel is that it takes place in the 1990s. And some very smart people in Marvel marketing decided it would be extremely awesome to create a website that looked like it came from the 1990s. And they were absolutely correct. IT IS GLORIOUS. It’s like someone had consumed all of Geocities and held it in too long, and when the opportunity came they just vomited it ALL out all over the internets. Animated GIFs. Poorly-digitized pictures. Comic Sans. Unnecessarily long scroll. An idiotic “game” you can play. Broken images. A guestbook. A trailer that plays in a tiny little box. Clashing, psychedelic backgrounds and incoherent color schemes. It’s all spot-on, heightened to 1,000%. I larb it.

Just in case you’re reading this at some unspecified point in the future when this website is no longer its current awexome self, I’ve taken taken an image capture of the entire site below. Click to enlarge it. You shan’t regret it!

Captain Marvel Website

Do, please click to enlarge. You shan’t regret it.

Categories: Links, Movies.

Monday, 7 January 2019

Movie Review: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Does whatever a Spider-Man… Men… Woman… Pig… can…

Does whatever a Spider-Man… Men… Woman… Pig… can…

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018): ★★★½

Directed by Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, & Rodney Rothman

There hasn’t been a Spider-Man Movie (that I’ve seen) that quite so successfully encapsulates the sheer exuberance of swinging through a city as Spider-Man.

Much of that must be credited to the wondrous visual style of SMItSV. Most animated movies nowadays have one visual style, and the whole movie looks like it. But SMItSV has a very idiosyncratic and expressive range of styles; individual scenes are animated with different effects depending on the need of the scene. And indeed, later in the movie when a handful of characters are introduced, they’re all animated in their own individual style in addition to the style of the movie. It’s simply amazing to look at, and extreme care was taken to make sure each shot in the movie looks as gorgeous as possible.

I’ve seen some complaints (mostly from those who have only seen the trailer/commercials) about the jittery-looking framerate, but the whole movie from what I could tell never dips below 12fps (which is the same framerate as such beloved animated movies as, you know, Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King), so it never bothered me in the least. It just made it look like an animated movie instead of a CGI movie trying to ape real life. And I for one really appreciated that.

But beyond the look of the film, SMItSV is an excellent, very well-told story. It’s mostly the origin story of the Miles Morales version of Spider-Man, who hails from an alternate dimension. The relationship at its emotional core is about Miles and his dad, the strangely-named policeman Jefferson Davis (what black mother would name their son Jefferson Davis!?!?). Some great story and emotional beats about fitting in and figuring out how to find your passion and also help others flow through the film. Miles is an endearingly awkward and scatterbrained teenager just trying to figure out who he is even before he gains spider powers. The sequence where he goes to his Uncle Aaron for advise about the ladies (the “shoulder touch”) and then disastrously tries to implement that advice is just so well done. Also hilarious is the fact that for most of the movie, Miles is dressed up in a cheap Spider-Man costume bought at a cheap costume shop.

There is also a plot that involves villains breaking through dimensional barriers that acts as an excuse to introduce a bunch of different versions of Spider-Man from alternate realities.

Of these, the past-his-prime Peter Parker and the Gwen Stacy Spider-Woman (commonly referred to as “Spider-Gwen” in this world) are the most well-developed. Gwen in particular is incredibly appealing, with a great characterization and fantastic design (including a great albeit unintentional hairstyle). There’s a great running gag that whenever a new spider-person is introduced we see a quick, comic-book-style flashback of their origin story so that we get the gist of the character very quickly. In a lesser movie all these characters would muddy the proceedings up and the movie would become scattershot, but SMItSV is so firmly focused Miles’s story that everything that everything these characters do is brought around to how it affects Miles. That does mean that the other spider-people (other than Peter and Gwen) kinda get the short shrift, especially Peni. But this never really was their story, so I was okay with it.

My only quibble about SMItSV is the relative weakness of the villains, mostly because they have almost no screen time at all due to this being solidly Miles’s story. Dock Ock had the most interesting characterization as a mad scientist who wasn’t evil so much as just thoroughly delighted by mad science. I thought that giving Kingpin an unbelievably thick New-York-thug accent was a huge mistake. Kingpin has always styled himself as a cultured Manhattanite, not a lowly thug from Brooklyn. He should have a cultured New York accent.

If you don’t believe me that SMItSV is great, it just last night won the Golden Globe for best animated feature, beating out The Incredibles 2 and Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs. So there.

Categories: Movie Reviews, Reviews.

Thursday, 3 August 2017

“Of the Month” August 2017

Video Game of the Month:

Mighty Gunvolt Burst

A while back, two of the people who were the driving forces behind the Mega Man and Mega Man X franchises created their own video games: Mighty No. 9 and Azure Striker Gunvolt respectively. The first one had… problems. The second one was pretty good. Well, now they’ve been combined in an 8/16-bit game that truly does feel like you’re playing a brand new Mega Man game. The main difference is that you don’t gain specific weapons by defeating bosses; instead you gain weapon configuration options by finding hidden modules throughout the stages. These let you craft your own weapons: trajectory, speed, # of on-screen bullets, etc., etc., etc. ad infinitum. Seriously, the sheer number of configurations you can do is insane. The only problem is that the menu system UI is not user-friendly, and since there is no instruction manual it is pretty difficult to figure out how to navigate it. But the game itself is a lot of fun, especially to me since I do so heart the original Mega Man series of games.

Show of the Month:

Castlevania

Lemme ask you a quesion: Do you like the writing of Warren Ellis? If you do, then this show is for you, because it was written by him and is full of the kinds of touches that he loves to include in his works. This “series” is really just a feature-length pilot episode inexplicably broken up into four parts. I don’t know why they bothered to do that. It serves to introduce us to (most of) the main characters based on the video game Castlevania III: Dracula’s Curse (my favorite of all the Castlevania games). It is surprisingly well-done for a video game adaptation, and the inclusion of a corrupted church as the real villain of the piece is an inspired (and very Ellis) choice. The characterization of Trevor Belmont as a disgruntled former hero who is now basically an alcoholic is great. There are a couple of great, well-choreographed action scenes that let you see just how much of a badass Trevor actually is, and towards the end of the series when he rallies townfolks and shows them just how you defeat demons is a great moment where you really see, holy shit, this guy is something. I do wish the show took place in more than one location; the Castlevania III game has sprawling, varied settings, from swamps to forests to caverns and clock towers. You get some hints of that in this pilot, but I do hope the actual series coming later expands the setting to include all of the crazy, wacky things that you can find in a Castlevania game.

Comic Book of the Month:

Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur

A comic book about an absurdly intelligent little girl, Lunella Lafayette (in recent issues it was discovered that she is actually the single smartest human being currently in existence), who gets bonded to an enormous, pea-brained dinosaur. Most of the fun of the book comes from playing off Lunella’s immense frustrations with the fact that because she’s just a kid she doesn’t have any of the resources or freedoms to take advantage of her huge intellect. She’s often railing at the sheer stupidity and lack of understanding that surrounds her, from her well-meaning-but-clueless parents to the idiocy of the superhero community that she gradually becomes a part of (she develops crime-fighting gadgets and eventually the superpower of being able to swap minds with Devil Dinosaur). It’s a great read, Lunella is a fascinating character, and the art does a great job of expressing the emotions going on in this preternaturally gifted girl.

Categories: Of the Month.

Friday, 1 May 2015

“Of the Month” May 2015

TV Show of the Month:
daredevil
Daredevil

Hot-damn, this is how you do Daredevil. This show is dark. Dark. Horrible things happen to good people. Routinely. The heroes are mostly powerless, and lose more than they win (for the most part). The villain is a complex, developed character. Lies, betrayals, good ol’ Catholic guilt, and bloody, bloody beatings. All the performances are just spot-on, especially Vincent D’Onofrio as Wilson Fisk, AKA Kingpin. He’s like a gigantic tea kettle that is constantly in danger of boiling over, but at the same time is genuinely shy and uncomfortable around other people, and especially in public. Even though at times it is a grueling experience, it is an amazing show.

Album of the Month:

They Might Be Giants: Glean

They Might Be Giants have a new non-children’s album! And it’s very strong. The worst songs on this album drop only to the level of “average TMBG songs,” which still put them light-years ahead of most any other songs in existence. And the best songs are absolutely stellar. My favorite is “End of the Rope,” which has a very cool, almost-spy vibe to it and a wonderful lyric cadence. Also fantastic are “Madam, I Challenge You to A Duel” and “Hate the Villanelle” (which is actually a 100% correct villanelle, a very strict poetic form). But really all 15 songs are good stuff.

Documentary of the Month:
atarigameoverxbox
Atari: Game Over

A fascinating urban legend among nerdy circles is the tragic tale of the E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial video game for the Atari 2600. A huge bomb, it was critically and commercially panned, and Atari was stuck with warehouses full of unsold cartridges. Legend says they were unceremoniously buried in a landfill in New Mexico. The whole tale is symbolic of the home video game crash of the early 1980s, which wouldn’t be rescued until the NES hit the scene. This documentary is part historical—tracing the rise-and-fall of Atari and the 2600’s place in nerd history, as well as the personal history of the programmer who actually created the E.T. video game—and part mystery. Did this landfill event actually happen? Can it be found? There is a surprising amount of build-up and suspense!

Categories: Of the Month.

Friday, 22 August 2014

New Movie Review: Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)

Something rotten in the state of SHIELD...

Something rotten in the state of SHIELD…

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014): ★★★½

Directed by Anthony & Joe Russo

This is easily one of the best movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Whereas the first Captain America was a purebred, Feel-Good WWII War Action movie, and The Avengers was a top-notch Tentpole Popcorn Movie, The Winter Soldier takes a completely different tack: it is an extremely tense Dark Political Thriller. More… »

Categories: Movie Reviews.